Image courtesy of Daudi Cijntje

Sun 5 May '19 - Pirate Bay

Caribbean Ancestry Club

The Pirate Bay welcomes the Caribbean Ancestry Club!
17:30
WORM

Our first Caribbean Ancestry Club event in the city of Rotterdam, home to a large number of people from Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Statia and St. Martin. Come celebrate our love for the Caribbean!

Caribbean Ancestry Club is hosting a family-friendly evening full of love, with poetry and spoken word performances, music,* kuminda krioyo* (island food) and intergenerational “show & tell” talks from ABC & SSS islanders.

The theme of our first event is memories and family histories, and how to
share and archive knowledge for future generations in predominantly oral Caribbean cultures. Audience members will be invited to share memories of home (island and/or diaspora), and they are encouraged to bring a story or personal item to reflect on their memories.

Caribbean Ancestry Club will host this event in the WORM Pirate Bay, WORM’s in-house archive. We’re excited to contribute the work and legacies of our communities into the archive of WORM, so be sure to bring materials like CDs, DVD, and otehr materials that you’d like to share with others.

Everybody is welcome to join, but the voices of ABC & SSS islanders will be centralized.

With live performances by:
Stacy Alves
Kalib Batta
Benedicta
Laura Koolman
Naeem Juliana
DJ K-Dushi
The Blakes

Entrance: FREE
Language: English, Dutch, Papiamentu/o

Caribbean Ancestry Club is a project born out of love for the Caribbean, by Alfrida Martis and Daudi Cijntje. Alfrida calls Bonaire home, and Daudi calls Curaçao home. They are proud of their Afro-Caribbean heritage and believe in the healing and restorative powers of love and communion. By organizing events and community gatherings they wish to unite and amplify voices of Afro-indigenous Caribbean peoples, especially islanders from Bonaire, Statia, Saba, Curaçao, Aruba and St. Martin.

Caribbean Ancestry Club is a space where Caribbean peoples can fully be themselves, exchange their experiences on island and diaspora life, colonialism, intergenerational traumas, activism, cultural rituals and practices, art, ancestral knowledge and family memories.