Sat 10 Feb '18 - Workshop

Shadow Wolf Cyberzine Workshop w/ Legowelt

Learn about E-Zines!
15:00
WORM

The Avantgardistic State would like to emulate Cyberspace; a concept that extends all over the place, lightyears removed from your lolcatz and Facebook likes…a transcendental hyperreality matrix from seedy little corners only visited by enlightened freaks to an infinite world of clandestine knowledge that extends into infinity without any control. Now is a chance to take our first steps with the Legowelt Workshop: CYBERZINE (part of S D & L 0 N E L Y

During this afternoon workshop we are going to make a new issue of the Shadow Wolf Cyberzine!

Legowelt will give a brief introduction and history on cyberpunk E-Zines (or Cyberzines), pre internet BBS culture and ASCII art and explain how to come up with freaky subjects, write articles, make ASCII Art yourself and use the necessary software (SEAMONKEY composer in this case)

E-zines were ASCII text file-based magazines written by Hackers, freaks, nerds, Sci-Fi fans, outcasts, psychotic weirdos, mad dealers and kindred folk, about what was happening in their lives, to reach out to other people with similar interests, lonely people scattered around the world connecting in CYBERSPACE and creating their own micro cultures around their hobbies and beliefs. They were distributed through computer networks and floppy disks before the dawn of the internet – mostly distributed through BBSs (Bulletin Board Systems).

People would download these e-zines on their 300 baud modems and read them on monochrome green screens late at night. It’s difficult to imagine this now but doing this felt like the most exciting thing in the world, surrounded by a mystique of hacker romanticism and being a cyberpunk pioneer.

These E-zines were text files Most of these e-zines would be about hacking and anarchic subjects. They would have cool names like MAGIK (Master Anarchists Giving Illicit Knowledge) MINDCRIME, The Scrolls of Serenia, HAKD (Ho’z ASCII Anarchy Komputerz and Drugz), SURFPUNK Technical Journal, some of them like the legendary PHRACK and HEX40 magazines still exist today.